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HOME
GALLERY
STUDIO
DOCUMENTARY
WHANAU
MOKO
BEHIND THE SCENES
BIO INFO
BLOG

KATE WILLIAMS
EDEN #WHYIDANCE
MIKE DAWES
ASHLEY #WHYIDANCE
MARK LOWNDES
MARIE-CLAIRE #HANDSOFHOPE
WARD FAMILY
EMMASYN #WHYIDANCE
CONNY VAN LINT
JAMES BLACKWELL
NIKON WORLD PHOTO DAY 2017
TOM WOOLER
KIRA
VIEW ALL POSTS
TESTIMONIALS CONTACT PROOFING

EDEN #WHYIDANCE

Eden McAuliffe. Dancer.

"I started dance when I was four years old. I did everything; ballet, jazz, tap, even song and dance. But then the further through I got the more I started branching off towards the ballet contemporary side of things.

I think initially why I branched out like that was that I found ballet to be so rewarding. I got such a feeling of accomplishment out of the strictness of ballet. You put in the hard work and eventually you get there; you feel good and you feel like you've achieved something.

And then when you go across to contemporary, you are free. Like I could just express myself and just be me. It's not really about trying to get somewhere in contemporary, you're not trying to get to a particular point - it's more just about being who you are. You express yourself out. It's hard to explain but that's what I enjoy about contemporary. I can do it my way and that's ok.

Ballet you follow the structure, and I love that, but when you get over to contemporary work... you have more input, you do it how you want to do it and that really drew me in.

-

I'd dance most afternoons after school. I'd drive over to dancing and dance until late at night. But then in year ten I started doing part time dance, so I had a day off school every Wednesday where I'd be in the studio from 8am till 4pm doing my Certificate 3. Then in year eleven and twelve I've been over at Queensland Ballet Academy. Now I'm out the door by 6am every morning, dance until lunch, go over to school and get home at six at night. Long days. It's tiring and trying to fit everything in is hard. Especially seeing everyone else go home at three and you're like "I've gotta keep going".

Then this year I also made time to go to the gym. Fitting that into my schedule every night has really helped with a few muscle, back and neck issues I was having; issues from not being strong enough I guess. Which is why I started going to the gym a lot this year - even though when you're there you're tired and you're in pain and you don't wanna be doing it. But, I did find that about six months in everything was feeling much stronger and it helped my body cope heaps better with the constant workload that was being given to us.

I'm not gonna lie, I have my days I want to sit and do nothing; sleep all day. And there were weeks where I was barely coping, but once you get into the routine it becomes a lifestyle. And it helps to be surrounded by people and other dancers doing the same thing and in the same situation as you. That makes it easier. You help each other through, be there for each other and lift each other up.

-

Sometimes it gets a bit tough and you get worn down; you're like 'what am I doing?' But usually in those times, when you're feeling like you you've had enough, you'll have a moment that reminds you why you dance.

Like towards the end of last year when I was struggling getting up in the morning but... I don't know, you sort of force yourself to do it. You don't want to, but at the same time you can't stop yourself from doing it either. It's sort of like an addiction. You find a way, you push on, and you do it anyway. Something in my head makes me get up and then once I'm there and I've done some classes, my mental state changes again. I'm like I love this and I'm so happy I came. In the movement you have the realisation why you love it so much, you have the reminder why you are doing it. It's a passion. It's my passion and nothing can stop me.

Its a little bit hard to describe and explain. It's like, I don't know, I guess that's why I dance. I struggle sometimes with words; but when I dance, then I can express it.

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Now that I'm out the other end of dance schools and the training and I'm looking into companies, I'm seeing that it's balanced out more and that there is an even number of males and females. That makes it easier now, but defiantly going through the younger years, being one of the only males, or one of only a few males in a class, that was hard. I think there are a lot of dance schools that are not set up to cater for boys. You walk in and the walls are pink, the uniforms are pink, and there are all female teachers. It's hard as a young boy to feel like you belong. And then there is the image or stigma, in middle school especially, that if you are a male dancer you are a bit weak. But when you look at it further down the track, when you come out of it and you look at these male dancers who are athletes; they're just machines. The power and the raw energy that they bring is amazing. The girls bring strength too of course, and they have to do pointe.... Thank god I don't have to do pointe. I probably would have quit dancing if I had to do pointe [laughs].

I don't know where to from here. I think because I'm still so young I just need to keep training and keep building until I absolutely know that I'm ready.

I always have thought about teaching dance, and I've actually considered setting up a boys ballet school - a school just for boys. I know how hard it is for the boys in a female dominated profession, especially in the early years. I have definitely considered and looked into what goes into running a dance school and it's something I'm prepared to invest in. For the future of, not only the boys, but for the art. I don't ever want to see the art dying, especially in Australia.

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My favourite dancer? That's a hard question, you can't do that! I love all of them.

So many. Like Daniil Simkin. He is an amazing dancer. He came out of Russia. There's Steven McRay. Oohhhhh he is beautiful. Australian born; from the racetrack to dance. He's incredible. Ivan Vasiliev. Roberto Bolle. Carlos Acosta; he's Cuban and I met him when he was over here. Sergei Polunin.

They're all amazing. And there are so many more. I could be here all day. I can't choose!

I met Daniil Simkin when he came here to Brisbane. That was... wow! He is an amazing dancer and such a nice person. He came out of Russia where his father Dmitrij Simkin trained him from a very young age. His Dad and his Mum were both dancers too.

He was performing at the ABT (American Ballet Theatre). We went to watch and I couldn't stop looking at him the whole show. After the show we went down to the back of the theatre. A lot of the dancers had already come out of the green room so we were standing there for ages, but he didn't come out. Everyone had left and I was like no, I'm not leaving till I see him. And then finally he walked out. I just walked over to him and hugged him. I couldn't not.

-

Outside of dance I'm an adventurer. I love being involved in extreme sports like snowboarding, skateboarding and surfing. I love tumbling tricks and big jumps!

My message is especially to the boys - don't give up, we need you. There will be some people that don't realise, that what you are doing, is bloody amazing. You're training six days a week. You're physically and mentally up there with any other athlete.

So yeah, push through and don't give up!"

 

Eden McAuliffe
@trickyeddie